Japanese Mothers Testing for Radiation in Food Post-Fukushima Disaster

Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

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The “Mothers’ Radiation Lab” in Iwaki City, Fukushima Prefecture is staffed by local mothers who test foods, water, soil and other local materials for nuclear radiation.

In the aftermath of the 9.1-magnitude earthquake and tsunami that caused the nuclear power plant in Fukushima to leak radioactive materials, a group of Japanese mothers work to ensure local food is safe to eat. Despite lacking a scientific background or university education, they are passionate about informing keeping the public informed.

Although levels of radiation have declined since the 2011 incident, these mothers know the struggle for safe food and water is not over. “Mothers’ Radiation Lab” staff has found Shitake mushrooms, which are often included in Japanese cuisine, have the highest noticeable levels of radiation.

“How do you fight these invisible threats? The best way is to measure them,” says Kaori Suzuki, director at Mothers’ Radiation Lab.

https://www.linktv.org/shows/trust-docs/japanese-mothers-find-high-levels-of-radiation-in-food-post-fukushima-disaster

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Informal Labour, Local Citizens and the Tokyo Electric Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Crisis: Responses to Neoliberal Disaster Management (Part 1)

Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

By Adam Broinowski

Introduction
 
The ongoing disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (FDNPS), operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), since 11 March 2011 can be recognised as part of a global phenomenon that has been in development over some time. This disaster occurred within a social and political shift that began in the mid-1970s and that became more acute in the early 1990s in Japan with the downturn of economic growth and greater deregulation and financialisation in the global economy. After 40 years of corporate fealty in return for lifetime contracts guaranteed by corporate unions, as tariff protections were lifted further and the workforce was increasingly casualised, those most acutely affected by a weakening welfare regime were irregular day labourers, or what we might call ‘informal labour’.
 
During this period, many day labourers evacuated rented rooms (doya どや) and left the various yoseba (urban day…

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New study says Minami-soma as safe as Western Japan cities – do they really expect us to believe this?

Fukushima 311 Voices

新しい調査によると、南相馬市は西日本の都市と同じくらい安全だそうです。こんな調査結果が信じられるでしょうか?

On September 5, 2017, Minami-soma city made a statement on the city’s radiation levels compared to 3 cities in West Japan, which has been reported in several newspapers. It’s important to comment on this study because the statement is intended to persuade the population to return to live there.

We are publishing comments on the articles below after having discussed with M. Ozawa of the citizen’s measurement group named the “Fukuichi Area Environmental Radiation Monitoring Project“. For English speaking readers, please refer to the article of Asahi Shimbun in English. For our arguments we refer to other articles published in other newspapers – Fukushima Minyu and Fukushima Minpo – which are only in Japanese.

2017年9月5日、南相馬市は同市と西日本の3市の外部被曝ばく線量を測定し、その結果について発表しました。いくつかの新聞が報道しています。この発表は住民帰還を促す意図を持っていますので、コメントすることが重要かと思われます。

ふくいち周辺環境放射線モニタリングプロジェクトの小澤洋一さんにお話をお聞きし、以下のコメントを投稿いたします。以下に引用するのは朝日新聞の記事ですが、これは英語と日本語と両方で報道されているためです。朝日新聞には記載されていないことが福島民友福島民報に報道されていますので、そちらも適宜引用させていただきます。

Here are the locations of Minami-soma and the 3 other cities.
南相馬市と記事に登場する3市の位置については下記の地図をご覧ください。

map 4 cities

Here is the article of the Asahi Shimbun

Fukushima city shows…

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Radiation Hotspots Near Tokyo

2.17μSv/hr ~ 19 millisieverts per year, approx 214km south west of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant:

Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

From Sugar Nat

Present radiation hotspots in Nagareyama city, Chiba Prefecture (near Tokyo)

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Measure taken at 1m from the ground : 0.57μSv/h

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Measure taken at 50cm from the ground : 0.89μSv/h

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Measure taken at ground level : 2.17μSv/h

Read more in Japanese :

http://hotspot-i-t.blogspot.fr/2017/06/blog-post_11.html?m=1

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Fukushima Insoluble Radioactive Particles (part 3)

Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

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We are presenting here a transcription of an NHK TV documentary (note1) on insoluble radioactive particles found in Fukushima and in the Tokyo metropolitan region. This is the 3rd part of the 3 parts.

Her is the 1st part : https://fukushima311voices.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/insoluble-radioactive-particles-part-1/

Here is the 2nd part : https://fukushima311voices.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/insoluble-radioactive-particles-part-2/

As you can see below, small insoluble radioactive particles are dispersed in the Tokyo metropolitan area. We believe that this represents serious health problems for the population in terms of internal irradiation, since the insoluble radioactive particles remain in the body for a long time. For anybody who would stay in this metropolitan area, further radioprotection against internal irradiation would be required.

 

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Takeda: I will ask Yuichi Moriguchi, who is carrying out investigations on radio-contamination caused by the accident, including the insoluble radioactive particles, how many of such insoluble radioactive particles exist and in what range of area?

Moriguchi:…

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Fukushima Insoluble Radioactive Particles (part 2)

Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

1.jpgWe are presenting here a transcription of an NHK TV documentary (note1) on insoluble radioactive particles found in Fukushima and in the Tokyo metropolitan region. This is the 2nd part of the 3 parts.

Here is the first part.

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Insoluble radioactive particles that do not dissolve in water.

This characteristic is supposed to make a big difference when considering health effects.

In the past, radioactive cesium emitted in the nuclear accident was thought to be carried away adhering to water-soluble particles called aerosols in the atmosphere. When it touches the water the particle melts and the cesium diffuses and gets diluted. The same is true when it is inhaled in the lungs; the water-soluble cesium melts into the body fluid and spreads thinly throughout the body. Then it is supposed to be discharged gradually by the metabolic activity, and decreases by half from 80 to 100 days in the case…

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Fukushima Insoluble Radioactive Particles (part 1)

Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

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We are presenting here a transcription of an NHK TV documentary (note1) on insoluble radioactive particles found in Fukushima and in the Tokyo metropolitan region. Since it is quite heavy with images, it will be uploaded in 3 parts.

These particles contain cesium, which has the property to dissolve in water. However, in the case of these particles, the cesium was taken into glass-like particles during the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident before it was blown away by the explosion. These particles do not dissolve in water, and as a consequence the cesium will remain longer both in the environment and in the human body, which will modify the impact of radioactive materials on the environment and on health.

Here the video in Japanese: https://youtu.be/ipOEfS-06FM

Takeda: A round particle like a marble.
Rugged particles like asteroids.
Presently, the researchers are paying attention to them.

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Very small particles contain radioactive cesium.

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